St Helens and Knowsley hospital trust named best in England

Whiston Hospital

Chief executive Ann Marr at Whiston Hospital

First published in News Runcorn and Widnes World: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter

WHISTON and St Helens hospitals are the best in the country, and that's official.

St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust has been ranked as the best NHS trust in England in the national patient-led Assessments of the Care Environment programme (Place).

These assessments inspect and score all acute and specialist organisations throughout England and are carried out with the involvement of patients, patient representatives and members of the public.

It scored 99.99 per cent for cleanliness, 93.69 per cent for food, 98.04 per cent for patient privacy, dignity and wellbeing and 99.33 per cent for the condition, appearance and maintenance of the buildings.

Many Halton patients are treated at both hospitals.

Chief executive Ann Marr, who lives in Widnes, said: “It is fantastic news that the trust has been named the best in the country and that Whiston and St Helens hospitals achieved the highest score in the latest environment assessments.

"Our staff work very hard to maintain the highest standards and these results highlight our commitment to providing patients with excellent facilities and high quality care.”

Comments (1)

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11:28am Fri 29 Aug 14

GuiltyCol says...

I've been treated in Whiston hospital and it is indeed very nice. But am I missing the point here? Surely the measures that really count aren't things like food and appearance, but whether they effectively treated patients, cured them, or kept them alive?!?

I'm actually working at the moment writing reports for a computer system the NHS uses, and I've been asking for 2 years why there isn't a report entitled: "How many people died on our watch?".

The answer: the people who use the system just don't want that report. I find that shocking, but when assessments like this focus on tertiary issues over patient care, then it's no wonder; culture starts at the top.
I've been treated in Whiston hospital and it is indeed very nice. But am I missing the point here? Surely the measures that really count aren't things like food and appearance, but whether they effectively treated patients, cured them, or kept them alive?!? I'm actually working at the moment writing reports for a computer system the NHS uses, and I've been asking for 2 years why there isn't a report entitled: "How many people died on our watch?". The answer: the people who use the system just don't want that report. I find that shocking, but when assessments like this focus on tertiary issues over patient care, then it's no wonder; culture starts at the top. GuiltyCol
  • Score: 11
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