Urban Trikes launch pioneering waterless car wash in Runcorn

Mike Wheelhouse and Anthony Bate

Mike Wheelhouse and Anthony Bate

First published in News Runcorn and Widnes World: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter

A PIONEERING waterless car cleaning service has been launched by a Runcorn inventor.

Mike Wheelhouse is hoping his environmentally friendly Urban Trikes will reduce our carbon footprint, create jobs and provide safe drinking water and sanitation across the world.

He is donating a percentage of his takings to the charity, WaterAid.

Mike, aged 42, from Sandymoor, said: “It is a totally different way of car washing. Instead of water, we use a high quality fluid which cleans Bentleys and Rolls Royces in Dubai.

“It reacts to dirt and grime and has a lot of green credentials. It contains only the finest ingredients with latest cutting edge scratch-free technology. It saves tons of water and harmful chemicals.”

His solutions are biodegradable, non toxic and neutral in PH and save around 250 litres of water per car, the equivalent of 25 buckets of water. He also cleans caravans, motorhomes and boats.

Mike operates his business from a unit in Pimlico Road, where he makes the tricycles.

He plans to offer franchises and expand overseas.

He added: “It’s like a window cleaning round.The more people who use our trikes and bikes, the fewer vehicles are on the road which means a reduction in carbon emissions.

“The good thing is we come to you. I’m hoping to target companies with a corporate responsiblility and clean their staff cars.

“Cycling is good for your health and the environment.”

Paula Cain, chief executive of Halton Chamber of Commerce and Enterprise, said: “It’s always great to see innovative and exciting new businesses being launched in Halton.

“We wish Mike and his team all the best of luck.”

Comments (4)

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7:31am Wed 23 Apr 14

GuiltyCol says...

Whilst I like the sentiment, "saving 250 litres of water per car" is nonsense, as that water isn't destroyed. It goes into the drains and back into the ecosystem. So instead of reusable water, he's suggesting spraying chemicals all over the car, but notice no information was given on what the chemical is, we just have to take it on trust that it's safe.

As I said, I like the sentiment but need more convincing about the green credentials of his mystery spray.
Whilst I like the sentiment, "saving 250 litres of water per car" is nonsense, as that water isn't destroyed. It goes into the drains and back into the ecosystem. So instead of reusable water, he's suggesting spraying chemicals all over the car, but notice no information was given on what the chemical is, we just have to take it on trust that it's safe. As I said, I like the sentiment but need more convincing about the green credentials of his mystery spray. GuiltyCol
  • Score: 0

10:12am Wed 23 Apr 14

Highway61 says...

GuiltyCol wrote:
Whilst I like the sentiment, "saving 250 litres of water per car" is nonsense, as that water isn't destroyed. It goes into the drains and back into the ecosystem. So instead of reusable water, he's suggesting spraying chemicals all over the car, but notice no information was given on what the chemical is, we just have to take it on trust that it's safe.

As I said, I like the sentiment but need more convincing about the green credentials of his mystery spray.
No water goes into the drains and has to be recycled, I think that's the whole point. They also don't use any harmful chemicals. If you have a look at the Urban Trikes website it might answer some of your questions.
www.urban-trikes.com
. Their entire range of products are manufactured in the UK to BS EN ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 industry leading accredited standards.
[quote][p][bold]GuiltyCol[/bold] wrote: Whilst I like the sentiment, "saving 250 litres of water per car" is nonsense, as that water isn't destroyed. It goes into the drains and back into the ecosystem. So instead of reusable water, he's suggesting spraying chemicals all over the car, but notice no information was given on what the chemical is, we just have to take it on trust that it's safe. As I said, I like the sentiment but need more convincing about the green credentials of his mystery spray.[/p][/quote]No water goes into the drains and has to be recycled, I think that's the whole point. They also don't use any harmful chemicals. If you have a look at the Urban Trikes website it might answer some of your questions. www.urban-trikes.com . Their entire range of products are manufactured in the UK to BS EN ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 industry leading accredited standards. Highway61
  • Score: 0

10:58am Wed 23 Apr 14

GuiltyCol says...

Highway61 wrote:
GuiltyCol wrote:
Whilst I like the sentiment, "saving 250 litres of water per car" is nonsense, as that water isn't destroyed. It goes into the drains and back into the ecosystem. So instead of reusable water, he's suggesting spraying chemicals all over the car, but notice no information was given on what the chemical is, we just have to take it on trust that it's safe.

As I said, I like the sentiment but need more convincing about the green credentials of his mystery spray.
No water goes into the drains and has to be recycled, I think that's the whole point. They also don't use any harmful chemicals. If you have a look at the Urban Trikes website it might answer some of your questions.
www.urban-trikes.com

. Their entire range of products are manufactured in the UK to BS EN ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 industry leading accredited standards.
There's no more information about the chemicals used on the urban trikes site than there was in the article.

ISOs 9000 and 14000 are generic process standards to ensure consistency and will have nothing to do with the product itself.
[quote][p][bold]Highway61[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GuiltyCol[/bold] wrote: Whilst I like the sentiment, "saving 250 litres of water per car" is nonsense, as that water isn't destroyed. It goes into the drains and back into the ecosystem. So instead of reusable water, he's suggesting spraying chemicals all over the car, but notice no information was given on what the chemical is, we just have to take it on trust that it's safe. As I said, I like the sentiment but need more convincing about the green credentials of his mystery spray.[/p][/quote]No water goes into the drains and has to be recycled, I think that's the whole point. They also don't use any harmful chemicals. If you have a look at the Urban Trikes website it might answer some of your questions. www.urban-trikes.com . Their entire range of products are manufactured in the UK to BS EN ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 industry leading accredited standards.[/p][/quote]There's no more information about the chemicals used on the urban trikes site than there was in the article. ISOs 9000 and 14000 are generic process standards to ensure consistency and will have nothing to do with the product itself. GuiltyCol
  • Score: 0

11:20am Wed 23 Apr 14

Highway61 says...

GuiltyCol wrote:
Highway61 wrote:
GuiltyCol wrote:
Whilst I like the sentiment, "saving 250 litres of water per car" is nonsense, as that water isn't destroyed. It goes into the drains and back into the ecosystem. So instead of reusable water, he's suggesting spraying chemicals all over the car, but notice no information was given on what the chemical is, we just have to take it on trust that it's safe.

As I said, I like the sentiment but need more convincing about the green credentials of his mystery spray.
No water goes into the drains and has to be recycled, I think that's the whole point. They also don't use any harmful chemicals. If you have a look at the Urban Trikes website it might answer some of your questions.
www.urban-trikes.com


. Their entire range of products are manufactured in the UK to BS EN ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 industry leading accredited standards.
There's no more information about the chemicals used on the urban trikes site than there was in the article.

ISOs 9000 and 14000 are generic process standards to ensure consistency and will have nothing to do with the product itself.
Have you asked them to supply you any data sheets?
[quote][p][bold]GuiltyCol[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Highway61[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GuiltyCol[/bold] wrote: Whilst I like the sentiment, "saving 250 litres of water per car" is nonsense, as that water isn't destroyed. It goes into the drains and back into the ecosystem. So instead of reusable water, he's suggesting spraying chemicals all over the car, but notice no information was given on what the chemical is, we just have to take it on trust that it's safe. As I said, I like the sentiment but need more convincing about the green credentials of his mystery spray.[/p][/quote]No water goes into the drains and has to be recycled, I think that's the whole point. They also don't use any harmful chemicals. If you have a look at the Urban Trikes website it might answer some of your questions. www.urban-trikes.com . Their entire range of products are manufactured in the UK to BS EN ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 industry leading accredited standards.[/p][/quote]There's no more information about the chemicals used on the urban trikes site than there was in the article. ISOs 9000 and 14000 are generic process standards to ensure consistency and will have nothing to do with the product itself.[/p][/quote]Have you asked them to supply you any data sheets? Highway61
  • Score: 0

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