Cheshire's top cop to retire

Runcorn and Widnes World: Dave Whatton Dave Whatton

THE most senior police officer at Cheshire Police has announced he is to retire.

Chief Constable Dave Whatton, who is in charge of all policing in Cheshire, will step down in June.

It is believed the decision is based on reaching 30 years service in the police, having also served with Greater Manchester Police.

Chf Con Whatton will discuss the decision closer to the retirement date, police say.

The father-of-three joined Cheshire Police as Chief Constable in December 2008, replacing Peter Fahy.

He was awarded the Queen’s Police Medal in the New Year Honours List two years later, and has previously described cutting £10million from the police budget in 2011 as his biggest challenge.

The process to replace him has started.

John Dwyer, Police and Crime Commisioner for Cheshire, will make the appointment.

He said: "I enjoy a professional and productive relationship with Dave Whatton and whilst I respect his wishes to retire from policing, I would happily have extended his contract if he had so wished.

“We have made some difficult decisions together.

“These are big shoes to fill. I wish Dave all the best in his retirement.”

He is currently drawing up a shortlist of candidates, following the application stage, with the list due to be completed on January 31.

Interviews are due on February 10 and 11.

The new Chief Constable is expected to start on June 25.

Comments (7)

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10:24am Wed 22 Jan 14

GRUMPY PARENT says...

Cut £10 million from the police budget in 2011. Was that to ensure he gets his huge, inevitable, golden handshake!
Still Grumpy
Cut £10 million from the police budget in 2011. Was that to ensure he gets his huge, inevitable, golden handshake! Still Grumpy GRUMPY PARENT
  • Score: -2

12:56pm Wed 22 Jan 14

grey_man says...

His retirement may have more to do with the mysterious £300,000 payment he made to a female colleague who worked as the 'Head of Learning and Development' that the IPCC decided didn't warrant an investigation.
His retirement may have more to do with the mysterious £300,000 payment he made to a female colleague who worked as the 'Head of Learning and Development' that the IPCC decided didn't warrant an investigation. grey_man
  • Score: 0

1:46pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Karlar says...

grey_man wrote:
His retirement may have more to do with the mysterious £300,000 payment he made to a female colleague who worked as the 'Head of Learning and Development' that the IPCC decided didn't warrant an investigation.
And our self promoting PCC also chose to look from the wrong end of the telescope at that unexplained largesse instead of doing what he is supposed to do. I read that the chap who officially championed the introduction of PCCs said they should have had six weeks training on interpreting police crime figures and financing before they officially took up their posts.
[quote][p][bold]grey_man[/bold] wrote: His retirement may have more to do with the mysterious £300,000 payment he made to a female colleague who worked as the 'Head of Learning and Development' that the IPCC decided didn't warrant an investigation.[/p][/quote]And our self promoting PCC also chose to look from the wrong end of the telescope at that unexplained largesse instead of doing what he is supposed to do. I read that the chap who officially championed the introduction of PCCs said they should have had six weeks training on interpreting police crime figures and financing before they officially took up their posts. Karlar
  • Score: 0

4:20pm Wed 22 Jan 14

whatsgoingon1 says...

The Chief Constable would have over his 30 years service paid a large slice of his salary in his Pension. It is not a 'golden handshake'.
The Chief Constable would have over his 30 years service paid a large slice of his salary in his Pension. It is not a 'golden handshake'. whatsgoingon1
  • Score: 0

6:57pm Wed 22 Jan 14

old-codger says...

He may be taking retirement because he is fed up with our unwanted Police and Crime Commisioner taking the credit for all the work done by our Bobby,s. John Dwyer will now be looking for a volunteer to take on the post of Chief Constable to join all the other volunteers he wants working free of charge while he himself is paid £100k plus expenses.
He may be taking retirement because he is fed up with our unwanted Police and Crime Commisioner taking the credit for all the work done by our Bobby,s. John Dwyer will now be looking for a volunteer to take on the post of Chief Constable to join all the other volunteers he wants working free of charge while he himself is paid £100k plus expenses. old-codger
  • Score: 0

7:25pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Karlar says...

whatsgoingon1 wrote:
The Chief Constable would have over his 30 years service paid a large slice of his salary in his Pension. It is not a 'golden handshake'.
Most people in the private sector would give their eye teeth to get a pension the like of which the CC will receive, especially after only 30 years of service.
[quote][p][bold]whatsgoingon1[/bold] wrote: The Chief Constable would have over his 30 years service paid a large slice of his salary in his Pension. It is not a 'golden handshake'.[/p][/quote]Most people in the private sector would give their eye teeth to get a pension the like of which the CC will receive, especially after only 30 years of service. Karlar
  • Score: 0

9:13pm Wed 22 Jan 14

grey_man says...

whatsgoingon1 wrote:
The Chief Constable would have over his 30 years service paid a large slice of his salary in his Pension. It is not a 'golden handshake'.
Given what happened last year, it's more likely a 'golden goodbye and let's not say any more about it', in the way favoured by large organisations who prefer their dirty linen to remain unwashed and kept forgotten in the attic.
[quote][p][bold]whatsgoingon1[/bold] wrote: The Chief Constable would have over his 30 years service paid a large slice of his salary in his Pension. It is not a 'golden handshake'.[/p][/quote]Given what happened last year, it's more likely a 'golden goodbye and let's not say any more about it', in the way favoured by large organisations who prefer their dirty linen to remain unwashed and kept forgotten in the attic. grey_man
  • Score: 0

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